Tag: Caribbean

“Caribbean actors in Hollywood movies do not inspire me”

I love movies but, currently, seeing Caribbean actors in Hollywood movies does nothing for me

I anticipated BlackPanther’s release so much that I may have been the only local to have noticed the release date changed three times; from February 16, to the 22, and then the 21. I was livid, by the way, the day I noticed it was pushed back to February 22, noting that here in the Caribbean, we would be among the last–certainly the last in the African diaspora– to see it. On February 21, when by chance I logged in to the Caribbean Cinemas website and saw it was showing a day earlier, I joked with friends that it was a must that I be amongst the first on island to see the movie because no one deserved it more than I did (Marvel fans don’t fight me, it was really a joke, although I am also always one to say; people often disguise truths as “jokes”) but my reason for wanting to see it may differ from most.

Cast and Crew

In 2016, when I learned Chadwick Boseman was playing Blackpanther in Captain America Civil War, I dragged myself to the cinema to go watch a superhero movie—Superhero movies are not my least favourite but they certainly are not my most. Needless to say, I was a Chadwick Boseman fan. I had seen him in Get On Up, 42, even his smaller roles in movies like Draft Day, and as one of the few black faces in the tragically whitewashed “Gods of Egypt.” Ofcourse Boseman shone as BlackPanther in Civil War, and when Marvel confirmed the character would lead his own film, you guessed it, my non-superhero movie watching self was through the roof.

Months later, I discovered Ryan Coogler would direct BP which would also star Lupita N’yongo and Michael B Jordan alongside Boseman. It was not N’yongo’s impressive portrayal of Patsy in 12 Years a Slave or her other roles in The Jungle Book, Star Wars or as the flight attendant in Nonstop (yeah, I caught that one too) that had struck me most about the Kenyan actress. But more so the elegance, intelligence, class and sensuality with which she moves through the world all while cloaked in humility and “realness.”

Jordan on the other hand, caught my attention for less noble reasons. The crush I developed after seeing Chronicle for the first time ran deep. I was elated when I spotted him in the fourth season of the series Friday Night Lights. Although it has been over 6 years and fully healed from my crush, I had along the way watched Red Tails, That Awkward Moment, Fantastic Four, Creed and Fruitvale Station for more of Jordan’s magnetic, star power. The latter two movies mentioned however bring me to the most significant of reasons for my interest in BlackPanther; they were both directed by Ryan Coogler.

I learned of Ryan Coogler after watching Fruitvale station— the Director’s first feature film out of film school. I was hooked then, not by Hollywood glitz and glamour, but Fruitvale station told the compelling story of the deceased Oscar Grant who was unjustly shot dead in Oakland by police. I learned through interviews with Coogler and his leading cast that the film had received critical acclaim and picked up the Audience Award and Grand Jury price at the Sundance Film Festival as well as several other awards around the world. The fact that Coogler had made such an impact, right out of film school with a small budget was reason enough to follow his career. I would follow his career to when he made Creed. Coogler appears to move throw the world with a sense of purpose, naive millennial confidence coupled with a healthy amount of self-doubt, which I sense may very well be the driving force behind his pragmatic film-making style. The logistics behind his films are identifiable, yet seamless– he is a unique talent, one any young filmmaker would view as an inspiration.

Seeing Black Panther for the first time

When I made it to Caribbean Cinemas on February 21, Wednesday night, straight from work, I was there mainly for the cast and crew. All of whom ofcourse, did not disappoint.

My favourite character in the movie was Shuri. I fangirled over her coolness, her intelligence, her strength, and this was before I learned the actor playing her was Guyanese.

Both Letitia Wright and Winston Duke – actor behind M’baku, who now has a large group of female admirers– were heralded in Caribbean circles, primarily on social media, for their Carbbean heritage (Duke being “Trinibagonian”). When I learned of it, I too, proudly relayed the information to my family and friends and the news was met with pleasant surprise. But upon watching interviewe related to the film, I noted that both actors had left the Caribbean before the age of ten.

Opportunity

When atleast one parent is from the Caribbean, a child is bound to grow up identifying heavily with Caribbean culture but what they may not identify with is the actual physical limitations of living on a rock, or a dot on a neighbouring continent with similar history and setbacks. Caribbean people too, have dreams. We, as children, grew up watching movies like everyone else, and some of us developed a deep seeded desire to make and be in them as well. But for many of us, our dreams come to an abrupt halt once we leave secondary school and the impracticality of surviving on a passion forces us to change course simply because there is absolutely no avenue or opportunities for growth nor rewards for your natural expertise. You also have what feels like 0 resources at your disposal. The few of us who remain adamant about pursuing our interests ofcourse then, look for the easiest way to book a flight out. Will the time ever come when leaving will not be the only option?

Our creative industries often see the dark halls of inconsistency as ideas come and go; intiatives start, thrive then end— the money to keep them going never a certainty. We simply do not have the platforms to fortify our talents; to give artists that feeling of accomplishment, even after productions and projects begin, run and end. In a world where the American voice and accomplishments are so loud and bright, they penetrate our world at all angles and make our initiatives seem small, and overlooked by the wider public. Where as small towns in foreign places may have community theatres, where paid acting work may be only a bus or train ride away, here in the Caribbean, you better learn fast how to make your own oppurtunities.

Moving on, anyway

As we often do, we learn to press on. There are still creatives churning, working, growing, throwing things on the walls and hoping they stick. The Leila Janah quote “talent is evenly distributed, opportunity is not” often comes to mind when I think about Caribbean actors, filmmakers, directors and the like. Everyday, the number of persons pursuing their interest in film seems to grow here, especially with the rise in festivals, workshops, competitions and clubs. Information regarding the ease with which films can be submitted to local, regional and international festivals is reaching more people. We all look forward to that time when travelling will not be a necessity for working on craft, but only the positive result of hard work, opportunity and achievement.

So I Still Haven’t Seen Black Panther

I have never been too much of a movie buff. In fact, I can possibly count all the movies I’ve been excited to see at the cinema on one hand. I didn’t even go past my laptop screen to see some of my favourite movies. For the most part, I have always preferred books to movies – the detailing is always better when it is written down, and book to movie adaptations have almost always been disappointing. My basis for picking movies has always been on whether the book was great, or the trailer looks exceptionally exciting. I have never just watched a movie based on actors or directors. But just possibly, Black Panther was about to change that.

The marketing was perfect: an all-star black cast, African themes, action and even sex appeal. Black Panther as a superhero was nothing new. First appearing in 1966, Black Panther was the first superhero of African descent, at least in popular comic books. It was a remarkable stride, given the racially charged atmosphere of America at the time. Even now, in 2018, race is still a major issue in America, and seeing dark faces like Chadwick Boseman, Luptia Nyong’o, Angela Bassett, Michael B Jordan and Danai Gurira have actually ruffled some feathers – but I digress.

I was impressed. I wanted to see Black Panther just to appreciate Angela Bassett who I have always adored (and not even for her acting skills). But I still have not gotten around to it, weeks after the movies multi-million dollar opening. I watched as people bought tickets days before the opening in Saint Lucia, as they rounded up friends, as they posted vague reviews with attached gifs, expressing their absolute approval, as they rounded up different friends to see it a second time; as they had heated arguments and, as they reminisced over scenes where Michael B Jordan was shirtless.

I still didn’t go to see Black Panther. I didn’t even try to watch some illegally streamed version as I had done with what would become some of my favourite movies. Let’s leave it at the fact that I’m really just not a movie fanatic, and didn’t want to be in a crowded theatre either. But despite having still not seen the movie, I have come to appreciate what it has done for the black community – a sort of outsider’s perspective.

The saying ‘representation matters’ has never mattered more than in this particular instance. For the first time, black people have had the opportunity to enjoy a movie based on them, which was promoted on such a wide scale. Other black superheroes exist, and movies and series about them also exist, but nothing has been pushed as much as Black Panther has. Black people, the world round, have embraced the opportunity to cosplay to go to see a movie, to dress up in kente cloth outfits, and even face paint. Some referred to it as ‘the black people’s Harry Potter’. Admittedly, I thought the tribal face paint was a bit much, but who was I to judge when black people finally felt like they had made a huge impact in the film industry.

Movies like 12 Years a Slave and Fruitvale Station have always hit some nerves in certain pockets of society, but Black Panther was all inclusive, and especially inclusive of black people. Seeing a cast of mainly black characters, hearing African accents (though unauthentic) in a movie that wasn’t about oppression, and widespread genocide (at least that is what I have gathered) must be genuinely empowering.

Given the absolutely mind blowing amount of money that the film has gained, the records it has broken, and the recognition and fame that it has brought to both the actors and the director, Black Panther has become a staple of the black community – something to be spoken of for years to come. Not to mention, numerous actors are of Caribbean lineage which speaks to the immense talent of the people in the region and the diaspora. With word of an already solidified sequel to the movie, I just might have to finally go see and appreciate the original Black Panther, and perhaps witness firsthand what the hype about the shirtless scenes was all about.

How To Enhance Your Directing Process

 

Every film director is different. Especially when it concerns style, experience, execution, preferences and so on. After directing my own short film, these are a few things that helped my process.

1 Block your scenes through the viewfinder

The simple way to define blocking is, the movements of characters in relation to the movement of the camera (the audience’s point of view).  Of course, there are more than a few ways to block a scene. Depending on the director, a few lines of action and dialogue in a script could translate on screen as a comedy, drama, romantic comedy or a suspense scene. By this fact, blocking also involves the performance and not just the movement. Now for the tip: always block your scenes through the viewfinder when possible. (Obviously if you’re shooting on a DSLR you’d have to turn the camera off to view your shot through the viewfinder). Doing this forces you to think more consciously about the 3 dimensional space you’re dealing with as well as gauging the distance between the camera and the performer. Whereas blocking using the flat, two dimensional monitor doesn’t give you an accurate idea of spacing.

 

2 Use prime lenses

Why? For starters they’re sharper, more affordable, more portable (all relative by the way). But using lenses with a fixed focal length allows you to think more actively about how you shoot a scene. Because there’s no quick and easy way to get a closeup on an actor or to fit more in the frame, you’re forced to physically move the camera, which in turn affects the process of the actor, for better or worse. But overall it does let you think more creatively about getting a shot as opposed to just zooming in or out.

 

3 Know every process

Terry Gilliam once told Quentin Tarantino that <paraphrased; as a director, it’s not your job to know how to operate a camera, or move lights around to get a certain effect, or how to record sound or any of that. As a director,  your job is to have a vision. And then it’s your job to be able to articulate that vision to the talented people around you who can use their skill to help you achieve that vision.” For me, this is a more than perfect description of what a film director is. BUT, put plainly, you do give yourself a huge advantage when you have a working -not perfect- knowledge of what each process in filmmaking entails. You don’t need to be a DP for 3 years to know what a DP does but it’s good to be an instant expert on all processes so that 1) you know when your crew is lying to you that something can’t be done (lol) and 2) in the case of many independent filmmakers getting started, you’ll need to teach your crew how to do their jobs effectively, so the more you know the better.

 

4 Get to know who you’re working with

This could easily be overlooked but I think it’s highly important that you actually take time to find out what kind of personality types you’ll be spending your time with on a particular project. If they’re unlikeable, or worse yet, not knowledgeable enough then what could be a simple, fun project could end up dragging on and becoming a gloom. On the other hand, persons who are just as passionate and on a similar wavelength can be more fun and make you a better filmmaker overall.

 

— END

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Choosing ‘Art’ For A Living

Theatre production; Adaptation of Elena Garro’s ‘El Encanto, Tendajon Mixto’ – Mexican Embassy’s 10th anniversary celebration.

Theatre is a gem of an artform. Anyone who has seen a staged play live knows it can be likened to magic.

Kentillia Louis is an Artistic director, lecturer, manager and curriculum officer advocating for and enriching Arts and Culture in Saint Lucia. She has worked as the Artistic Director for the Walcott School’s Festival and as Director of Requiem for a Badjohn, a play staged for the first time in Saint Lucia earlier this year. She also manages the Youth Studying Performing Arts and Culture (YouthSPAC) organization, and works as a part-time lecturer at the Sir Arthur Lewis Community College and University of West Indies open campus, among several others gigs.

We were fortunate to have the opportunity in May of this year to pose a few questions to Kentillia on her experiences working as an Artist on a small, Caribbean island.

Q: Can you highlight the aspects of this profession you enjoy?

K: One of the things that I enjoy about being an artist in the Caribbean is that because of, I suppose, size there’s a camaraderie between us all. It doesn’t matter if it’s in Trinidad, Barbados, Grenada, Jamaica, everybody’s always willing to lend a helping hand. Always willing to try and see how they can collaborate or assist, because as much as we think we’re different, we all have similar issues.

Another thing is we have a rich culture. We have so many cultural forms that provide for the arts. We have material to create plays, to create performance styles, to use in so many different ways as stimuli for dance, drama anything. To find inspiration for anything that I do, it’s very easy, I just have to close the books, close the laptop and go out there and just observe my people, listen to the radio, listen to the music, watch the dancing and within there, something always comes up.

The good thing about our cultural forms is that it’s participatory. I mean you can go to the La Rose festival and you are not just be a spectator on the outside. Those different groupings are always very willing to include you, listen to what you have to say. So I really have enjoyed that, his is what gives me my identity and my unique approach. I’ve been able to really make sure i’m well grounded in it, in everything that I do to use it as my base.

Q: Can you highlight the challenges?

K: Always training-training and space. There are never enough spaces for training or opportunities for training – long term training I should say. There are always persons who approach me to join the group but i’m very particular about numbers. That’s why I have not increased the size past a certain point because we have a lot of young persons in Saint Lucia who are very, very talented, but they just have the raw material. What if we invested in them and helped them with the training and the exposure. As well as training them for showcasing opportunities because you can train, but you have to be trained to perform and be showcased.

We forget that not everybody starts off at the top, nobody did. Everybody had to build their way there and we have to, as a nation support them. That’s one of the major challenges, so sensitizing our public to the importance of supporting their own, even those up and coming, support them, because they will be the next big thing and it will be nice if you could be part of that experience with them.

Space has always been a problem- performance spaces. I mean right now we only have the National Cultural Center which is extremely limited and expensive. So persons who are building should put an auditorium. That’s what a lot of organizations do, and they will rent it out at a reasonable price. We can take that into consideration here. People think there are not a lot of groups but there are a lot of groups out there. They just don’t have the opportunity to perform in a proper performance space. That’s one of the major issues that we have right now.

I think as much as people understand the performing arts and culture, there is also not a respect for it and that’s one of the things I’d like to see change. That’s where your identity comes from, that’s where your sense of you comes from. We go to all of those platforms to balance our selves out when we feel angry, sad, and so forth. They’re crucial to us and our development as a person, as a society. And the respect that art should be given,it’s not being given right now. We do it as a by the way thing, we do it only as something we can use to maybe enhance the tourism product. But it’s more than that. Every society you find persons really holding on to their arts and culture because that’s where you find a sense of pride, you find reflections of yourself, that’s one of the things that we don’t have here.

Requiem For a Badjohn was staged at the National Cultural Center, Castries Saint Lucia in April of 2017

Q: You seem to have a passion for the performing arts as do many, but people often forego theirs after leaving Secondary School. As someone who continues to do work in this field, what other options can those with similar interests consider outside of school?

K: There are a lot of opportunities. I think though, when people think of the performing arts they only think of the performance aspect of it. To go out there and really survive in the arts you need to have more than one skill, for example I direct, I teach, I do production managemnet and I do stage management. So, you do more than one thing, it’s the same way everywhere else. You have to pay your dues. There’s also the amount of work you are going to have to do for free because you have to get your practical in as well as you building your name and your reputation. I see a lot of young persons going around saying “not for exposure” (referring to the ‘exposure not currency’ local campaign) and so forth, but I think we miss the point because I see every body jumping on that band wagon, but we have to be very careful… first of all if you’re an amateur you’re an amateur let me be very clear about that. You chose to be an amateur, you chose not to go an train yourself, you chose not to certify yourself, you chose not to do that, therefore if that’s the level you are going to hold yourself at, you’re going to be treated at that level. If you want to be a professional then invest in it, invest in it and pay for your training. There are a lot of clubs and certification courses you can do here, do them, pay the money and do it. And then start to build your credit within it, so then yes you can then look at a business or someone, a client and tell them this is my worth. That’s what needs to happen and once you have that skill you will get a job.

Q: Can you tell us a little more about Youth Studying Performing Arts and Culture?

K: The first group of students were students from secondary school and they were interested in continuing to look into the field as their employment, as their profession. And so, I continued with them, to train them in the various artforms, make sure to provide them with

various opportunities. Not only do you get training but you get real life opportunities to use your training whether it be in dance, drama, music and so on. And a lot of the work that we do has a cultural heritage component to it.

It is for the youth, the age range is about 14-25. So it really is for young people and their wants and needs really pushes everything that we do within those fields. We also do stage management, production management, we teach various parts of the different artforms and how to use performance to help bring about some kind of change or awareness.

Kentillia (upper middle) addressing four young performers during ‘she.lc 2017’ rehearsals

Q: Do you and the group’s members share a vision when it comes to the future of Saint Lucia’s Art and Cultural industries? 

K: Yes, it’s about producing the next set of artists and producers, stage management and so forth. We want to make sure we have a world class arts and cultural industry in Saint Lucia that someone won’t come and say “well that’s how they do it in Saint Lucia apart from the rest of the world”. No it has to be on par – whether it is you’re in Trinidad, Jamaica, New York, London, everything must be on par, that is what we are working towards, so that that way too, you have more opportunities, more changes, more chances of persons getting big not only here but going international and being able to make their name and to develop.

And, What kind of work do we plan to do in the future? Same like we’ve always done. Right now we just came from two major projects so  we’re on a break because one of the things I encourage is that my group members also do their individual projects and have their individual activities, because I also want to train them to have leadership qualities and take the initiative. A lot of them do individual work at carnival time, so usually we don’t do anything as a group during this time. But as soon as that’s done we do social events, we start training again and then we get ready for activities later on in the year and next year. So we are hoping to do a play or a short film towards the end of the year.

Q: Are there any current or upcoming projects from yourself or the organizations you work with that you would like people to know about?

K: At this point in time, I think we have found the fruits of our labour, it’s actually starting to show right now. There are lots of performance based youth groups around the island. From Youth on Fire in Anse La Raye, to Kiddie crew. So I’m just happy that all of those organizations are working. And what people fail to realize is that we are not in competition with each other. There’s this misconception that we are, but we all work together, we help each other because we realize that we are trying for the same thing and there’s not going to be a situation where there is too many of us. It’s all of us coming together to help to build Culture and Arts in Saint Lucia as well as to provide a medium for young persons.

There’s a lot going on when you look at carnival bands, when you look at Kiddie’s carnival bands coming on, a lot of people who have created the bands are persons who went through some sort of training as performers, in Theatre Arts, music stage management, stage production and so forth. A lot of those persons who have bands now will tell you its in those kind of groupings they got their start. I think a lot of those young persons are becoming their own entrepreneurs, I’m very happy to see that.

In terms of me personally, I’ll be working with CVS to ensure that their summer youth platform program comes off and is as educational and entertaining as possible for the participants. And I’m working towards Nobel Laureate week, that’s my next big thing.

 –END

 

Interview w/ Caribbean Filmmaker Pierre Chester

Millennials – Technology – Creativity. Is it me or do these three go hand in hand now?

This is certainly the era of the Iphone, the Android.. of Instagram, YouTube and the like. Consider it .. how many photographers and videographers do you know? It’s cool though, who doesn’t like a fancy photo, or some quick burst of ethereal scenery in motion? How many of us spend an embarrassing number of hours skimming through the portfolios of creative lens maestros? Not to mention we especially love the work of our counterparts who think outside the box and use their gifts to tell unique stories. Pierre Chester is a storyteller/ filmmaker from Saint Lucia.

To read about Pierre’s journey and perspective on Film in the Caribbean, click here.

“Being on set is a great feeling, with everybody coming together and making a script come to life, it’s a rush.” – Pierre Chester

 

Gilroy H- Choosing Art No Matter What

A dedicated, young, Caribbean Artist. I have known Gilroy for a little over ten years now. Although his persisting passion towards Art was something I came to notice later than sooner, his creativity had always stood out to me. Not long into my brainstorming session – trying to figure out how many interesting, inspiring people I knew to possibly feature – did he occur to me as an obvious choice. Below is a snippet of our interview:

You have been doing this for so many years, what would you say pushes you to continue with your Art so consistently? 

There are actually different reasons for me pushing myself to continue…trying to be an inspiration to others especially those younger than myself to show them that even if it’s difficult and people tell you otherwise that you should always believe in yourself and do what makes you happy, do what makes you feel complete.

For my Family and not just those related by blood but the friends who became family as well. They have been with me throughout this from the beginning. From me as a child drawing on everything in the house to me being stubborn turning down jobs because it had nothing to with Art. To me leaving jobs because I felt limited and stifled as an artist and wanting that freedom to create whenever I felt like it. It’s been tough, really tough. I won’t say there were not times when it felt useless doing this because at the end of the day, bills had to be paid, mouths to feed.

But they’ve always had my back, supporting and encouraging me telling me that a door will open some way somehow…I just had to keep pushing. It’s given me that drive, that mentality to overlook everything. Even after suffering a life changing injury from my previous job which has now put so many limitations on my life, my mobility, what I am able to do and not do now these people still encourage me to focus on my happiness even with these limitations and everything else will just fall into place when you work hard enough for it pray and continue to trust in God.

 

To read more, click here.

 

 

5 Caribbean Art Festivals To Look Out For

For years Caribbean Artists have ploughed the fields of creativity in order to bear works that adequately reflect the region’s unique stories and perspectives. Interestingly, with each passing year, the margins of artistic platforms widen (a feat perhaps of the rapid technological advancement characterizing this age), allowing for increased opportunity and audience interaction; more places and spaces where artists can share their work. Yet, many still express that there is a lack of respect shown towards their craft. Nonetheless, several Caribbean Artists refuse to be pushed beyond despair into a place where they are made to abandon their beliefs in their work and their purpose.

In the hopes of one day having a more than thriving Art culture here in the Caribbean, I went searching for consistently held regional Art Festivals, ones which serve as platforms for both new and seasoned, regional writing, filmmaking and performance talent. Below are five that everyone should look out for.

 

1) The Trinidad & Tobago Film Festival

In 2016, some 26 films were featured at the Trinidad & Tobago Film Festival; an annual event held in Port of Spain to showcase the work of Trinidadian, Caribbean and international filmmakers, and to highlight projects that appeal to the Caribbean Diaspora. Among selected and screened projects are feature length films and documentaries, as well as short and experimental films.
Actual screenings are put on for about two weeks in September, however entries are accepted as early as February of the same year.
The committee behind the Trinidad & Tobago Film Festival encourages Caribbean Filmmakers to submit their work for free via their website http://ttfilmfestival.com/ where more information regarding the festivals history as well as submission regulations can also be found.

 

2) Calabash International Literary Festival

One of the longest running Art Festivals in the Caribbean, the Calabash International Literary Festival was founded in the year 2000. Held in Treasure Beach, Jamaica the event is hosted on a benial basis, on even years.
This event attracts book lovers, authors and anyone willing to bask in a downpour of reggae, relaxation and literary prowess, in a quaint South coastal Jamaican village. The Calabash International Literary Festival Trust which operates the event also provides publishing seminars and writing workshops throughout the duration of the festival.

For more information visit: http://www.calabashfestival.org/.

 

3) Carifesta – The Caribbean Festival of the Arts

‘Carifesta xiii’ is slated to be held in Barbados with the theme “Asserting Our Culture, Celebrating Ourselves” from August 17th to August 27th of this year.
With a name most Caribbean nationals are already familiar with, this event stages a number of creative Caribbean “music, dance, drama, painting, sculpture, folk art, photography and literature” talents.
The festival which comes around every few years, aims to highlight the kaleidoscopic vibrancy and diversity of Caribbean and South American cultures and artistry.

For more information visit www.carifesta.net.

 

4) GIMISTORY; The Cayman Islands International Storytelling Festival

Storytelling is rooted in tradition and is one of the world’s oldest art-forms.
From November 25th to December 3rd story tellers from all over the world travel to each district of the Cayman Islands as well Cayman Brac and Little Cayman, to perform stories some of which meant to reveal details of ancient “myths and legends”, as well as to evoke “laughter, drama and wonderment”.

The event, which began in 1997 and is held annually, serves as a canvas for the imaginations of audience dwellers. With its storytellers as the brushes, each word strokes the assorted colours and layers of the world’s heritages.
Through an application process the festival’s founders and operators welcome anyone to its stages.

For more information visit http://www.artscayman.org/gimistory.

5) Caribbean Youth Film Festival

A fairly new festival aimed at creating opportunity and a platform for precisely younger filmmakers, The Caribbean Youth Film Festival is a four day event held in Saint Lucia. This year the festival, which is held annually, will run from August 7th to August 17th making it five years now since its inception.

The Caribbean Youth Film Festival committee invites anyone ’35 and under’ to submit his/ her work (short films only) which will be screened to local and international audience members.
In the spirit of cultivating the Caribbean’s film landscape, the committee adds to its roster workshops and seminars held around the time of the festival as well as throughout the year, for persons of all ages and backgrounds, whether new to the art of filmmaking or seasoned.

For more information visit facebook.com/CYFFestival.

Some say, ultimately, it really depends on a person’s will and dedication to his/her craft to determine whether they can build themselves up and together as an Artist. Knowing that there is an audience ready and willing to bare witness to ones work however, can serve as motivation, especially in a culture where emerging Artists may feel invisible.